Tag Archives: Academic Skills Center (ASC)

A Message from the Academic Skills Center and Tutor Clearinghouse

Hello everybody,

Here is a little info about the Academic Skills Center and the Tutor Clearinghouse.

The Academic Skills Center provides assistance to students in order to achieve academic success. The Center is available to any student, who wishes to improve their academic skills and ability to learn.

The ASC provides workshops, handouts and one-on-one attention to all students who request it. If you want to improve your grades and/or test performance, don’t feel comfortable talking in class, are attending class regularly but you feel like you’re missing important points, feel like you’re a slow reader, are having trouble completing tests in the allotted time, etc. the ASC can help!!

At the ASC, you can also find the Tutor Clearinghouse, which facilitates peer tutoring, study groups, and conversation partners!

To request or become a tutor visit us @ http://www.dartmouth.edu/~acskills/tutors/index.html and fill out one of the forms

If you want more information, have any questions or comments, visit us in Collis 301, visit us on our website (http://www.dartmouth.edu/~acskills/), send us a blitz @ Academic Skills Center or Tutor Clearinghouse, or give us a call at (603) 646-2014.

We’d love to help you – check us out!

Best,

The Academic Skills Center and the Tutor Clearinghouse

 

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ASK THE DOSCs: Starting Your Term Off Right

Welcome back from spring break! The first week of term isn’t even over  yet, but there are plenty of things that you can do to save yourself trouble during the rest of term and making sure it all goes smoothly. Here are just a few tips from your friendly DOSCs about their stitches in time to save nine.

Rachel says: “I like to schedule everything in my iCal right away – meetings, classes, other commitments. I also put in all of the big assignments (papers, exams) in each of my classes so that I have an overview of the term and can plan ahead for the weeks that seem the busiest. I also like to schedule one-time meetings in the beginning of the term; even though I feel busy now, I know I’ll only get busier as the term goes on.”

Jingna says:”Let’s see. I like making sure I get off to a good start by printing out most of my readings, taking out the books that I need, transferring my syllabi into my iCal, running errands, vacuuming, washing the sheets, planning out meals with friends, and getting in as much exercise as possible before things get crazy!”

Jihan says: “I try to plan my schedule flexibly during the first week. Especially if I’m not hundred percent sure what classes and/or activities I’ll be taking/doing, I try to space things out so that I don’t overcommit myself earlier in the term and get crammed in the middle when actually important things come in my way.”

Pierre says: “Set up a detailed calendar with EVERYTHING for the term in the first week.”

Angela says: “Like a lot other DOSCs, I try to write everything down in my planner during the first week so I know which weeks are going to be the busiest and can plan around that. I also do my best to stay on top of my readings and studying now before everything goes crazy and things get left by the wayside. It saves time when exams come around. Also, don’t forget to check in.”

Si Jie says:

CLASS: Avoid shopping. Emailing the professor beforehand and learning about the waiting list from the department administrator is a more efficient way to get into a favorite class.
ACTIVITIES/CREDITS: Always check banner for check in, degree audit, and PE class registration to make sure everything you need to do for the term is ready.
WORK ON CAMPUS: Work-study students, make sure to visit JobNet to grab available jobs for the term! word of mouth is also a way to go.

Plus, the Dartmouth Academic Skills Center has got some wonderful blank weekly, termly, and even 4-year planners to help you map out your term now. Visit their website and scroll to the “Time Management” section to download the templates and a detailed academic calendar for Spring 2012.

STUDY SKILLS: 10 Tips for Staying Well During Finals

A few weeks ago, we asked the DOSCs how they managed stress during exams. It’s more important than ever around finals when everything is piling up (especially if you’ve been unlucky and you have many end-loaded classes). The Academic Skills Center has compiled some great tips from Casey Gardiner ’11 on how to stay well during finals and make it through to Spring Break, which I promise is just around the corner.

1. Get adequate sleep. It will help you work more efficiently, learn and retain information better, and do better on your exams. (All-nighters are a bad idea for your health AND your grades!)

2. Try out relaxation exercises or a guided meditation: learn how to do them at http://www.dartmouth.edu/healthed/relax

3. Keep moving! Don’t cut out your exercise time during finals period. The gym is a great place for a study break (leave your readings and flash cards at home to give your mind a rest!) or go for a run or take a walk outside. Don’t want to leave your dorm? Go up and down the stairs a few times, have a dance party with your roommate, or do yoga.

4. Keep laughing. Laughter can reduce stress and improve your mood, so watch, read, or listen to something funny as a study break!

5. Watch your caffeine intake. It will stay in your system longer than you think and can keep you from falling asleep when you need to. Adequate sleep, healthy eating, and exercise can keep you energized without caffeine!

6. Let your eyes rest. Give your eyes periodic breaks while you’re studying. Look out the window at something far away and focus on it for 15 seconds before returning to your computer screen or textbook.

7. Eat healthy foods. Protein-rich foods can help you sustain your energy and your focus. Sugary foods can give you an immediate energy rush, but you’ll crash later. Leave the library to get some fresh air and a balanced meal instead of ordering in or overdoing it on Novack baked goods.

8. Take a walk outside, especially in nature. It will clear your head, get you moving, and can help improve your memory!

9. Eat breakfast before your morning exams!

10. Keep everything in perspective: they’re just exams. You’re really smart, and you can handle them.

 

Good luck on finals and have a relaxing interim break!

 

Cheers,

Angy

 

PS. For a printable version of this information and much more, check out the ASC website. Or just pay a visit to the ASC; they’ve got walls of handouts that are wonderful and informative and loads of really friendly and helpful people.